Could We, Please, Finally, Move Forward? Reinventing the Wheel in Digital Higher Ed Research

I keep hearing that the pace of change is picking up in digital higher education in 2017; that higher education is in a period of "transformation".  And yet . . . as if to deliberately splash cold water on my happy thoughts, I read a short article in this morning's Times Higher Education Supplement (source) which suggests otherwise.

The National Tertiary Education Union in Australia just released a report that, according to one of the authors, "explodes the myth" that it takes less time to prepare and teach an online course than on-campus courses. (Report: study)

As the report suggests, it is important that we have a sense of how much time is devoted to different roles and responsibilities within the institution. But it has been long known that online courses take longer to prepare than classroom versions. Did the authors not do any secondary research? Frankly, they could have simply walked down the hall and asked one of the staff that specialize in online education. We've known this for at least fifteen years. How could a major survey like this be funded, involve the participation of multiple academics from different institutions, and yet fail to know that there is little debate about the question they seek to answer.

More troubling, though, is that there are still people working in this field don't recognize that a well designed, and well-resourced online course should take much longer to build and if we take our jobs as educators seriously. Much longer. Moreover, most courses shouldn't be built by an individual faculty. Individual faculty don't have a sufficient range of skills, the time to devote to the process, ample professional incentives, or funds. As a result, most courses that rely on in-house content development rely on repurposed classroom materials. This approach ensures that the course falls short of realizing the full potential of the online environment.

The Australian study isn't an isolated incident. Have you attended a conference focused on digital higher education in the last year? I am consistently stunned by presentations by well-intentioned professionals who, one after another, ask and answer questions that were raised fifteen years ago by other professionals - sometimes at the very same conference. By and large, I've stopped attending conferences. Sure, they can be useful for setting up multiple meetings, but I'm not hearing much of anything new. Are you?