Edtech’s Betty Crocker Moment

Betty Crocker introduced its cake mixes in the 1950s. The mixes made the process of baking cakes less prone to failure. Faster too. For many, especially over-burdened women working at home, this was a huge leap forward. But the cake mixes didn't sell especially well. So, using market research and input from psychologists, the decision was made to design the … Continue reading Edtech’s Betty Crocker Moment

Production Value in Online Higher Education

We can interpret the rise in production value of MOOCs as a sign of what's to come for all of online higher education, or as merely an aberration - a by-product of the one-upmanship that characterized the response by elite institutions to the onset of MOOC-mania. I would argue that it's the former - for two reasons.

Scale, Economies of Scale and Online Higher Education

:: The first piece from the series, Internet Economics”, can be found here: Internet Economics and Online Higher Education.  The third piece from the series, Internet Economics", can be found here: The Network Effect and Online Higher Education.  :: The "iron triangle" of cost, quality and access in higher education has seemed, at times, unbreakable. … Continue reading Scale, Economies of Scale and Online Higher Education

Higher Education is Not a Newspaper (Except when it is)

It has often been suggested that higher education is undergoing the changes we've seen unfold in other sectors - notably music recording and journalism. The Internet will do to us what it did to them. Apparently, we won’t like it. "Look at the music industry. It's been completely overturned by the Internet. My vision of the … Continue reading Higher Education is Not a Newspaper (Except when it is)

The Growing Chasm in the Online Higher Education Market

A chasm is beginning to appear between institutions of higher education that offer online programs. It's a divide created by the different strategies taken for designing, sourcing and managing online education programs. A small number of institutions in the U.S. have adopted methods for producing and supporting online courses that have the potential, if not the liklihood, to improve learning outcomes, increase the speed with the institution improves the quality of teaching and learning, increase value (quality/cost) and, possibly, reconfigure the deeply embedded hierarchy that frames higher education.

The Lecture in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

One factor that we may not have considered is how lectures fit into a broader cultural framework that privileges original and live events (or one-of-a-kind objects) over reproductions and technologically-mediated experiences.

Is That All There Is? Higher Education’s Struggle to Leverage Digital Teaching and Learning

I'm confident then about the potential of technology-enabled learning. However, I’ve grown increasingly less confident that the institution of higher education can play a major role in realising this potential. Evidence is mounting that the institution of higher education, as it is currently designed, is largely ill-suited to developing and leveraging more advanced uses of technology for teaching and learning. And given the institution’s near monopoly on widely recognised adult education in much of the West - higher education is likely inhibiting the development of more advanced forms of instructional technology and media, as well as new ways to bring these new forms to people at lower costs.

Acting Like a Professional, Costs, and Escorts, Et Cetera: Leaders’ Collection 10.25.2016

Date: 10/18/2016 Author: Dr. Keith Hampson 0 Comments — Edit A hand-picked (lovingly) collection of news, reports, and essays of interest to leaders in higher education by Keith Hampson, PhD.

Unbundling, Design Thinking, Et Cetera: Leaders’ Collection 10.18.2016

A hand-picked (lovingly) collection of news, reports, and essays of interest to leaders in higher education by Keith Hampson, PhD.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes . . . (Leaders Collection, 10-11-2016)

This week's collection of essays, news, and reports for leaders in higher education. All lovingly hand-picked.

The Intersection of Higher Ed and Hiring: Q&A with Sean Gallagher

Dr Sean Gallagher is the Chief Strategy Officer for Northeastern University's Global Network. Sean is a nationally recognised expert with more than 15 years of experience in strategy and innovation in higher education. His first book, "The Future of University Credentials: New Developments at the Intersection of Higher Education and Hiring," was published in 2016. :: … Continue reading The Intersection of Higher Ed and Hiring: Q&A with Sean Gallagher

Grade Inflation, Frugal Librarians, and More: Useful News for 09.19.2016

The Typical Undergraduate Takes More Than 5 Years to Graduate The average undergraduate takes between five and six years to complete a degree, according to a new report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The average bachelor’s-degree candidate takes just over five years to graduate. The findings of the report, which pulled data from 3,600 postsecondary … Continue reading Grade Inflation, Frugal Librarians, and More: Useful News for 09.19.2016

Manners Maketh . . . A 19th Century Guide to Etiquette

In an age when Donald Trump, Kanye West, and "the Kardashians" serve as role models, we may need to revisit what kinds of behaviour deserve our attention and respect. It all starts with values, of course, but good etiquette - and its proper daily application - can take us a remarkably long way. Paying attention … Continue reading Manners Maketh . . . A 19th Century Guide to Etiquette